• Food carrier unit
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Details of food unit
  • Key characteristics of the food system
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution
  • Food equality through health and supply based distribution

Food equality through health and supply based distribution

How might our food intake and food distribution look like in a sustainable future lifestyle? 

According to the Oxfam report “Growing a better future” (Oxfam, 2011), the number of hungry people worldwide passed the one billion mark in 2009. With the global population rising, food is a problem that will grow in size and complexity. How might we use design to propose solutions to the growing food problem?

Visualising research

The project takes a starting point in a fictional scenario in 2050 and a future sustainable lifestyle that society has adopted by then. The scope came about when reflecting on how to approach sustainability from another angle using an optimistic future scenario as a contrast to the dooms-day scenarios being pushed out by the general media. The setting is based on realistic future optimistic scenarios found in research on how we might live in the year 2050.

The project is an investigation into how design can be used to provide alternative perspectives on food issues. The proposal focuses on minimising our individual food footprints by focusing on the consumption and user experience part of the food chain. Based on individual health readings performed seamlessly in your everyday life, you receive food deliveries to your home. 

The food you receive is adapted to your needs considering both physiological and psychological aspects. Food is produced in local food centers and consists of a combination of 3D printed foods (replacing the most energy demanding foods in production), and natural foods (keeping the connection to nature and utilising the most nutritionally dense natural foods in nature). The food is delivered in food containers with sensors for safe identification. The natural food keeps growing inside the containers through nutrition seed pods until the user “harvests it” before consumption.

The aim of the project is to present an alternative and thought provoking perspective to how we can relate to food in a sustainable lifestyle in the future.

Ideation

Date: June 2014 Client: MFA Design degree project, HDK School of Design and Crafts Skills: Conceptual, Future vision, Product, Social Design, Speculative


Head of Design at Smartly. Designer passionate about creating engaging products and experiences. Specialised in designing for health and well-being, and the process of using design as a tool to address social and global issues.

*Due to client confidentiality, some works cannot be published online. Please contact me for more info.*

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